The Column Best in DFW Theater 2014

Val Kilmer Interview

 

 

 

Subscribe

 

exochi webdesign

Reviews for Current Shows

ANNIE ANNIE
(National Tour) Music by Charles Strouse, Lyrics by Martin Charnin, Book by Thomas Meehan Based on “Little Orphan Annie” by Permission of Tribune Content Agency, LLC 2014
Presented by AT&T Performing Arts Center
Runs through 7/5/2015

Reviewed by Genevieve Croft ,
Associate Critic for John Garcia's THE COLUMN

Premiering on Broadway in 1977, Annie is based on Harold Gray’s comic strip, Little Orphan Annie, a little red headed orphan and her adventures with dog Sandy, and benefactor, Oliver Warbucks. Little Orphan Annie inspired a weekly radio serial in 1930, and a popular film version in 1982, starring Broadway legends Carol Burnett, Bernadette Peters, and Tim Curry. In 2014, a dismal, loosely based adaptation of Annie starring Jaime Foxx, and Cameron Diaz introduced new audiences to Annie, in a modern re-telling of the story. Annie has also been integrated into other areas of pop culture. In one episode of the witty sitcom, Frasier, Frasier Crane anxiously awaits his turn for a caricature portrait of himself. In his haste, he insists a young girl take her incomplete portrait and leave. She ...

read the full review >


DIRTY DANCING THE MUSICAL DIRTY DANCING THE MUSICAL
(National Tour) Book by Eleanor Bergstein
Presented by Dallas Summer Musicals
Runs through 7/5/2015

Reviewed by John Garcia,
Senior Chief Critic/Editor/Founder for John Garcia's THE COLUMN

The creativity machine that vicissitudes motion pictures into stage musicals continues its metamorphosis, churning, whizzing, and cranking out each season at least two or three of this genre. The end result for them is quite vast in terms of artistry and the box office. Just this past season Broadway brought An American in Paris, which was one of the most artistically ravishing musicals transferred onto the stage that I have ever seen. When it comes to bringing celluloid to the stage boards, they can go down drastically different paths. They may not receive huzzahs from the critics, but the audiences flock to it regardless due to their love for that particular movie. Or it does receive critical praise, but suffers at the box office. Or they hit the gold mine when ...

read the full review >


MASS APPEAL MASS APPEAL
By Bill C. Davis
Presented by Circle Theatre
Runs through 7/18/2015

Reviewed by Charlie Bowles,
Associate Critic for John Garcia's THE COLUMN

Mass Appeal by Bill C. Davis is a play that appeals to people who have grown up in a church, which probably means most Americans. It doesn’t have to be a Catholic church, but knowing the social struggles that occur in church communities which spill over into a pastor’s office, and the humor those bring to the ministerial profession qualifies us to enjoy this comic look at Father Farley’s church.

Father Farley is a parish priest with a long history in his church. He knows what his parishioners want, what they’ll stand for, and how to herd them along the narrow path. His history with them makes him popular, but may hinder his ability to challenge their thinking and habits. One day, a young seminary student comes into his church, interrupts ...

read the full review >


AN AMERICAN IN PARIS- A NEW MUSICAL AN AMERICAN IN PARIS- A NEW MUSICAL
Music & Lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin, Book by Craig Lucas
Presented by Palace Theater, New York
Runs through 11/22/2015

Reviewed by John Garcia,
Senior Chief Critic/Editor/Founder for John Garcia's THE COLUMN

The 1951 MGM classic film An American in Paris (AAIP) is one of the very few movie musicals to take home the Academy Award for Best Picture, with a final tally of six golden statuettes.

It was originally a 1928 symphonic tone poem composed by Gershwin, He was inspired when he visited Paris in the 1920s.

The musical version of AAIP has a very (and I mean VERY) strong chance of taking back to the Palace Theater in June the Tony for Best Musical, and if it does, it will be the first musical that relies primarily on choreography to win since 2000 when Susan Stroman’s Contact took the prize.

All musicals have some semblance of dance, but a mere handful are mainly dance, such as Fosse, Jerome Robbins’ Broadway, and the aforementioned Contact. ...

read the full review >