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Reviews for Current Shows

I and YOU I and YOU
By Lauren Gunderson
Presented by Circle Theatre
Runs through 5/23/2015

Reviewed by LK Fletcher,
Associate Critic for John Garcia's THE COLUMN

DEADLINES.

Deadlines. They can be angst ridden to even the most stoic of individuals. Take a chronically ill, perpetually bitchy, homebound high school senior, Caroline, (Mackie Louis) and impose a surprise visit from an unknown classmate, Anthony, (Nate Davis) who is insisting on collaborating for the all important American Lit project due tomorrow and that deadline can feel like life or death to two teenagers.

The two person cast featuring two mis-matched teens who inhabit award winning playwright Lauren Gunderson’s “You and I” is part of a National New Play Network "rolling" premiere. Gunderson is a young and prolific playwright. A finalist for Susan Smith Blackburn awards, and a winner of this year’s ATCA Steinberg Award she weaves a masterful and complex web in which lie silken treasures of the human ...

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THE LIAR THE LIAR
Adapted by David Ives from Pierre Corneille’s “Le Menteur”
Presented by Theatre Three
Runs through 5/31/2015

Reviewed by Scott W. Davis ,
Associate Critic for John Garcia's THE COLUMN

The seventeenth century brought us a ton of talent. It started with Shakespeare and moved on to Moliere, both my favorite Renaissance playwrights. Shakespeare took England by storm while Moliere was one of three of the best French writers, joining with Racine, and yes Corneille. Pierre Corneille was born in 1606 in Rouen, France. At eighteen he actually studied to be a lawyer but proved extremely unsuccessful. He then turned to writing. His first show, “Mélite”, was performed by a traveling group that immediately added it to their repertoire. The show became a huge hit in Paris and Corneille was off as a writer.

The Liar, or Le Menteur, opened for the first time in Paris in 1644. It ran for ages without any changes, but in the 1800’s an ...

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THE LITTLE FOXES THE LITTLE FOXES
by Lillian Hellman
Presented by Richardson Theatre Centre
Runs through 5/31/2015

Reviewed by Chris Jackson,
Associate Critic for John Garcia's THE COLUMN

“Take us the foxes, the little foxes that spoil the vines: for our vines have tender grapes.” - Song of Solomon, Chapter 2, Verse 15, King James Version

“I hope you die. I hope you die soon. (Smiles,) I’ll be waiting for you to die.” - Regina to her wheelchair-bound husband, Horace. The Little Foxes, end of Act II.

The fictional Hubbard family, in this 1939 drama by Lillian Hellman, is reputedly drawn from Hellman’s own Alabama family history. The play premiered on Broadway on February 15, 1939, running for 410 performances and toured extensively in the United States. It starred Tallulah Bankhead as Regina Giddens in a career-making performance. Ms. Bankhead, ...

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AN AMERICAN IN PARIS- A NEW MUSICAL AN AMERICAN IN PARIS- A NEW MUSICAL
Music & Lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin, Book by Craig Lucas
Presented by Palace Theater, New York
Runs through 11/22/2015

Reviewed by John Garcia,
Senior Chief Critic/Editor/Founder for John Garcia's THE COLUMN

The 1951 MGM classic film An American in Paris (AAIP) is one of the very few movie musicals to take home the Academy Award for Best Picture, with a final tally of six golden statuettes.

It was originally a 1928 symphonic tone poem composed by Gershwin, He was inspired when he visited Paris in the 1920s.

The musical version of AAIP has a very (and I mean VERY) strong chance of taking back to the Palace Theater in June the Tony for Best Musical, and if it does, it will be the first musical that relies primarily on choreography to win since 2000 when Susan Stroman’s Contact took the prize.

All musicals have some semblance of dance, but a mere handful are mainly dance, such as Fosse, Jerome Robbins’ Broadway, and the aforementioned Contact. ...

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THE VISIT THE VISIT
Book by Terrence McNally, Lyrics by Fred Ebb, Music by John Kander Based on the play by Friedrich Dürrenmatt Adaptation by Maurice Valency
Presented by Lyceum Theatre, New York
Runs through 12/31/2015

Reviewed by John Garcia,
Senior Chief Critic/Editor/Founder for John Garcia's THE COLUMN

“I’m unkillable”. – Claire Zachanassian, The Visit


Life is difficult and unbearable at times. Maybe because of those who hurt you, destroyed you emotionally, used you, or after loving you disposes your heart like a piece of shredded tissue blown in the wind. In our darkest moments we all have those dangerous fantasies of destroying and seeking revenge on those people. Simply witness today’s world of constant war, racial tension, rape, spousal abuse, and loved ones killed by someone who wants his or her anger heard. Thankfully, most of us don’t go much beyond a quick flash of heated anger.

But what if you planned something down to the minutest detail, leaving nothing for error, and also had the resources to seek the type of revenge to satisfy your ...

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